Adoption Resources 

Education, training, and resources are all an integral part of the adoption journey. While raising a child may feel instinctual, parenting a child through adoption is very different than parenting children through birth. Having a strong tool kit is imperative to success. Below, we have compiled some resources we hope will help families – before, during, and after their adoption has taken place. There is always room for more learning.

*Disclaimer – information available through the links is the sole property of the companies and organizations listed therein. Brittany’s Hope provides this information as a courtesy and is in no way responsible for its content or accuracy*

Recommended Reading

For Parents

Raising the Rainbow Generation: Teaching Children to Be Successful in a Multi-Cultural World

While not an adoption-specific book, this material covers an issue faced by many adoptive families, prejudice. The books suggests words and concepts children can understand at various ages. 

Parenting Your Internationally Adopted Child

A guide for adoptive parents from preparations for a child’s arrival through the teen years.

The Connected Child by Karen Purvis

The Connected Child: Bring Hope and Healing To Your Adoptive Family examines behavior with a holistic approach, while discussing how the trauma of a child’s past affects behavior, fear response, processing, and brain chemistry. Based on research, it is presented in language for every parent to understand.

The Whole Brain Child by Daniel J. Siegel & Tina Payne Bryson

In this practical book for parents, neuroscientist Daniel J. Siegel and parenting expert Tina Payne Bryson explain the new science of how a child’s brain is wired and how it matures. A child’s brain develops at different speeds and understanding these differences can help you turn any outburst, argument, or fear into a chance to integrate your child’s brain and raise calmer, happier children.

Beneath the Mask: Adoption through the Eyes of Adolescents

A third of adolescents referred for psychotherapy are adopted. Adolescence is the peak period for psychiatric referrals in the life of the adoptee. This article addresses the six key areas of vulnerability that they can face, and how they can be supported.

For Children

Forever Fingerprints: An Amazing Discovery for Adopted Children

Forever Fingerprints uses a relative’s pregnancy as a springboard for discussions on birthparents, where adopted children are before they are born, and how that makes one little girl feel about it.

Guji Guji

A different sort of son in his own family of ducks, adopted crocodile Guji Guji proves to himself and others that family, no matter where or what that family may be, is worth protecting and cherishing.

The Invisible String

A heartwarming story about how we are all connected. 

Adoption Grants

While this is not an exhaustive list of adoption grant opportunities, many families who have received funds from Brittany's Hope have also found these organizations to be helpful.

Gift of Adoption Fund

The mission of the Gift of Adoption Fund is to fill the void that separates the child from family – through adoption assistance grants that give vulnerable children a permanent home and the chance to thrive.

Help Us Adopt

HelpUsAdopt.org helps hard-working families overcome the financial obstacles of adoption so that children can join loving and permanent homes. Families must include a valid home study and a copy of their tax return with their completed application and personal statement.

Lifesong For Orphans

Lifesong seeks to mobilize the Church to care for the orphan, where each member can provide a unique and special service: some to adopt, some to care, some to give.

National Adoption Foundation

The National Adoption Foundation is dedicated to providing financial support for adoptive families in order to assist them in the successful adoption of children. They are committed to improving each child’s chance of becoming part of a loving family. 

Show Hope

The mission of Show Hope is to care for orphans by engaging the Church and reducing barriers to adoption.

Adoption Tax Credit

We suggest you talk to your tax professional about qualifications for the adoption tax credit to know if you and your family qualify. Below are some resources to help you be informed.

Education and Training

Learn more before bringing your child home.

Adoption Learning Partners

Offering courses both for initial adoption training as well as ongoing training, Adoption Learning Partners “offers meaningful, timely, web-based educational adoption resources for professionals, parents, adopted individuals, and the families that love them.”

Adoptive Families Magazine

Magazine, both online and in-print, dedicated to the issues and topics surrounding adoption.

Child Welfare Information Gateway

The Child Welfare Information Gateway promotes the safety, permanency, and well-being of children, youth, and families by connecting child welfare, adoption, and related professionals as well as the public to information, resources, and tools covering topics on child welfare, child abuse and neglect, out-of-home care, adoption, and more.

What Teachers Should Know About Adoption

When adopted children join their new family, they bring life experiences that might include maltreatment and/or trauma. As a result, during the time leading into adoption and after the adoption is finalized, these children might exhibit some unique behaviors in the classroom. Therefore, it is important for educators to understand the reasons underlying the behaviors versus solely focusing on the behaviors.

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Adoption Resources?

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